A rainy day in Masouleh

Chaos in the stepped village of Masouleh

After leaving the Caspian Sea we headed to the mountains again, so we could visit the famous stepped village of Masouleh on our way to Tabriz (our last stop in Iran, before heading to the border and entering Armenia). The drive was a bit boring, but we were looking forward to being back in the mountains. 

The small detail which we didn’t take in consideration was the fact that half of Iran was also heading to the village!!! Since it was a long weekend because of Eid, lots of Iranian families had the same destination we did.
For the Portuguese reading, imagine you are trying to visit Obidos while they have the Medieval Festival, the Chocolate Festival and the Christmas Village all in the same day. On top of it, it’s raining and everything is getting super muddy. Got the picture? 🙂
The busy streets of Masouleh
The busy streets of Masouleh
Needless to say that the hotel that we were looking into staying was full, but we still managed to get accommodation in a small guesthouse – for lack of a better word, I will call it ‘rustic’.
The village was super crowded and all you could see was people moving from one place to the other, checking out the small stores of the Main Street mini bazaar and stopping for tea or food in one of the terraces ‘cafes’. Or taking professional photos in traditional village garments – it was absolutely hilarious to see the amount of people who were actually doing it.
Photoshoot in the mountains
Photoshoot in the mountains
Once we settled in our ground floor loft (eheheh) we decided to just mingle and have some tea, taking it all in.
Enjoying some Iranian tea
Enjoying some Iranian tea
Fortunately the next morning the town was a bit quieter, so we were able to enjoy it properly, before everyone woke up… We walked once again through the streets and the house roofs – one of the cool things about this village is that each roof becomes the street of the row above of houses, and got ourselves some ‘home made’ breakfast by getting some fresh bread straight from the bakery and fresh Iranian cheese from the grocery store.
Buying fresh bread in Masouleh
Buying fresh bread in Masouleh
Later on it was time to leave and head to Tabriz, our last destination in Iran before crossing the border to Armenia.

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